Subway Boys In The Hall: Hall Of Fame Hopefuls Athlete: Jake Peavy, P, Boston Red Sox

SUBWAY is celebrating The Boys In The Hall, examining certain players and their candidacy for the Hall of Fame. Jake Peavy is this week’s candidate. At 32 years old, Peavy should have several more years to cement his candidacy, but a move to the Boston Red Sox last week should go a long way towards helping his push.

1_bb_130425_subway_peavy_1280x720_28218947690When Jake Peavy was traded from the Chicago White Sox to the Red Sox last week before baseball’s trade deadline, it came as a shock to some. The White Sox had previously stated they wouldn’t deal Peavy. His move to the Red Sox may have fundamentally shifted the American League pennant chase simply because Peavy has been one of baseball’s best pitchers throughout his career.

Way back in 2002, I was a working for a television station in San Diego and was on hand to watch a 21-year-old named “Jacob” Peavy step to the mound for the San Diego Padres and be absolutely dominating in his debut against the New York Yankees. On June 22 of that year, he tossed six innings, allowing three hits and one run, while striking out four and walking two. He took the loss in a 1-0 decision but everyone who watched him that day and talked to him afterwards in the locker room, knew we had witnessed the start of something special.

Despite playing on a middling Padres team for most of his first eight seasons, Peavy developed into one of baseball’s best hurlers. The righty has always been known for his bulldog mentality and the fact that he has always gone right after hitters. He won the 2007 National League Cy Young Award after winning the NL pitching Triple Crown, leading the league with 19 wins, a 2.54 ERA and 240 strikeouts.

The day he was traded to the Chicago White Sox in 2009 was crushing for me as a Padres fan. But it was even more difficult watching him struggle with injuries for the past four years in Chicago. As a big fan of Peavy’s I am hoping the move to Boston signals a shift in his career as a change of scenery could do him well.

bith resizeWhile Peavy’s numbers don’t fall into the traditional Hall of Fame parameters, we could see a shift in the next few years as to how players are examined numerically. That said, Peavy does have some work to do thanks to being injured for much of the past four seasons.

Peavy has a career record of 129-97, his career ERA of 3.49 should drop as he regains his health, as should his WHIP of 1.18. Additionally, his 1,831 strikeouts are a testament to how dominant he can be.

While Peavy isn’t there yet, he will certainly be discussed as one of the best pitchers of his era, and with a few good seasons could creep into the discussion for a Hall of Fame spot.



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