Annual ‘Battle of I-75’ Between Toledo and Bowling Green Commemorated by Massive Corn Maze

A mere 25 miles separate Bowling Green State University and the University of Toledo. The Battle of I-75, the annual football game between the two Ohio schools, is one of the MAC’s fiercest rivalries.

Bowling Green and Toledo first met in 1919, but the rivalry met an abrupt end in 1936 when fans rioted after Toledo routed the Falcons 63-0. The teams didn’t play again until 1948, when they introduced a Peace Pipe trophy to signify the end of ill will between the schools and their fan bases.

Ironically, the Peace Pipe was stolen from the University of Toledo in 1969 and hasn’t been recovered. The schools introduced a new Peace Pipe Trophy in 1980.

Bowling Green-Toledo isn’t as sexy as other Midwestern rivalries such as Ohio State-Michigan or Michigan-Notre Dame, but there are plenty of people in northwestern Ohio who take the rivalry very seriously.

Take, for example, the people of Wheeler Farms in Whitehouse, Ohio, just south of Toledo.

For its annual corn maze, Wheeler Farms created a 16-acre tribute to the Battle of I-75. The behemoth maize labyrinth includes four corn mazes, which are a combined 6.2 miles long.

The 16-acre MAC football corn maze at Wheeler Farms in Whitehouse, Ohio

 

The maze is open today from 5:oo p.m. (Eastern) until midnight, tomorrow from noon until midnight, and Sunday from noon until 8:00 p.m. Adults can walk the maze for $8.00. Tickets for children and seniors are $7.00.

Official website



About Josh Tinley

Josh Tinley writes the Away From The Action column at Midwest Sports Fans, covering all aspects of sport aside from what actually happens on the field, court, or track. Josh grew up in Indianapolis and graduated from the University of Evansville and Vanderbilt Divinity School. He is the author of Kneeling in the End Zone: Spiritual Lessons From the World of Sports and the managing editor of LinC, a weekly curriculum for teens that explores the intersection of faith and culture. Josh lives outside Nashville with his wife, Ashlee, and children, Meyer (7), Resha Kate (5), and Malachi (3). He will not allow himself to die before the Evansville Purple Aces make another trip to the NCAA Tournament. Follow him on Twitter @joshtinley or send him an e-mail.

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