Were the Charlotte Bobcats Really That Bad? Yes – Just Look At the Numbers

With last night’s 104-84 loss to the New York Knicks, the Charlotte Bobcats completed the NBA season with a record of 7-59 and a .106 winning percentage.

The Bobcats broke the record for worst winning percentage in NBA history, sinking below the 1972-73 Philadelphia 76ers who posted a 9-73 record (.110).

The Bobcats’ seven wins is the worst win total since the Providence Steamrollers went 6-42 in 1947-48. The Bobcats’ number is obviously skewed by this year’s lockout-shorted 66-game season (16 games shorter than the standard 82-game season).

I’ll let you speculate on how many additional wins the Bobcats would pick up if they had 16 more games.

The Charlotte Bobcats suffer through loss #57. (Photo by Chuck Burton/Associated Press)

But looking at won-loss record alone won’t give you a full appreciation for just how bad this year’s Bobcats were. So let’s look at all the ways in which Charlotte was not only the worst team in the NBA this season but also one of the worst of all time.

Charlotte’s 23-game losing streak, sadly, is not the longest such streak in league history.

That record belongs to last year’s Cleveland Cavaliers, who lost 26 consecutive games from December 20 to February 11. But the Bobcats’ streak was cut off by the end of the season. Were there four more games remaining on the schedule there’s a good chance Charlotte would have broken Cleveland’s record. (Maybe next year they can pick up where they left off.)

The Bobcats’ average point differential was -13.9. No other team in the league was in negative double figures.

The second worst team in this category was Cleveland. The Cavs were outscored by their opponents by an average of 7.2 points, making them barely half as bad as the Bobcats. The Nets and Kings were the only other teams with worse than a -5 point differential. Charlotte’s -13.9 is the second worst point differential since the 1976 NBA-ABA merger. The 1992-93 Dallas Mavericks hold the record with -15.2.

Charlotte won only two games over teams that ended the season over .500: They beat the Knicks 118-110 in New York in the sixth game of the season and beat the Magic at home 100-84 on March 6. For the season the Bobcats were 2-35 against teams with a winning record, 5-23 against teams with a losing record, and 0-1 against the Phoenix Suns (who finished the season 33-33).

The Bobcats went 4-29 in Charlotte, setting the record for the worst home record in NBA history.

Of Charlotte’s 59 losses, 38 were by double figures. The Bobcats lost 20 games by 20 or more points. This total includes a pair of 28-point losses to the Washington Wizards, the team with the league’s second worst record.

No Charlotte player ranks in the top 60 in scoring. When you look at the list of this year’s scoring leaders, you won’t come across a Bobcat until you hit Kemba Walker at #67 (12.1 points per game). Gerald Henderson, who averaged 15.1 this season, would have been tied for #40 had he played enough games to qualify.

No Bobcat ranks in the top 50 in rebounds. Bismack Biyombo is 54th, with 5.9 boards per game.

These are your Bobcats, Michael Jordan. (Photo by Brian A. Westerholt/Getty Images)

As a team, the Bobcats were last in the league in points per game with 87.0. New Orleans, at 89.6, was the only other team below 90.

Charlotte was also dead last in field goal percentage at .414 (and adjusted field goal percentage at .439).

They were 29th (of 30) in both rebounds per game and rebound differential. To the Bobcats’ credit, they were in the middle of the pack in assists and turnover differential. They were actually eighth in the league in blocked shots, led by Biyombo who averaged 1.83 blocks per game (also eighth in the league).

Despite all of this the Bobcats drew more fans than the Indiana Pacers, a team with the fifth best record in the NBA and the third seed in the East.

For shame, Indianapolis. For shame.

About Josh Tinley

Josh Tinley writes the Away From The Action column at Midwest Sports Fans, covering all aspects of sport aside from what actually happens on the field, court, or track. Josh grew up in Indianapolis and graduated from the University of Evansville and Vanderbilt Divinity School. He is the author of Kneeling in the End Zone: Spiritual Lessons From the World of Sports and the managing editor of LinC, a weekly curriculum for teens that explores the intersection of faith and culture. Josh lives outside Nashville with his wife, Ashlee, and children, Meyer (7), Resha Kate (5), and Malachi (3). He will not allow himself to die before the Evansville Purple Aces make another trip to the NCAA Tournament. Follow him on Twitter @joshtinley or send him an e-mail.


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  1. […] lost by nearly 14 points every contest.  Their 0.106 winning percentage also happened to be the lowest in NBA […]

  2. […] lost by nearly 14 points every contest.  Their 0.106 winning percentage also happened to be the lowest in NBA […]

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