The Top 10 Performances In Summer Olympics History

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We are a mere three months and three days away from the beginning of the 2012 Summer Olympics in London.

To get you ready for this year’s games, here is a list of history’s ten greatest Summer Olympic performances.

This year’s games will be the twenty-seventh Summer Olympics. There have been dozens, if not hundreds, of memorable and legendary performances in the history of the Olympics.

The most difficult part of putting this list together was choosing only ten.

And since this is an American site with a largely American readership, the list is heavy on American athletes and Olympic sports that get big ratings in the States (track and field, swimming, and gymnastics).

Honorable Mention

First, the honorable mentions:

1912, Stockholm: A Greco-Roman Wrestling match between Russia’s Martin Klein and Finland’s Alfred Asikainen lasts 11 hours and 40 minutes.

1948, London: 17-year-old American Bob Mathias wins the decathlon, becoming the youngest ever athlete to win a track-and-field gold medal. He defends his title in 1952.

1960, Rome: An 18-year-old boxer from Louisville named Cassius Clay introduces himself to the world by winning gold in the light heavyweight class.

1960, Rome: Hungarian fencer Aladár Gerevich wins his sixth consecutive gold meal in sabre team. Gerevich’s streak is all the more impressive when you consider that the 1940 and 1944 games were canceled because of World War II. His streak spanned 28 years, beginning in 1932.

1968, Mexico City: Dick Fosbury wins gold in the high jump with an unconventional technique that would become known as the “Fosbury Flop.” Nowadays, world-class high jumpers use the Fosbury Flop almost exclusively.

 

Dick Fosbury "flops." (Photo by AFP/Getty Images)

 

1968, Mexico City: American Bob Beamon destroys the world record in the long jump. His record of 29 feet, 2.5 inches (8.90 meters) stood for 23 years.

1984, Los Angeles: Gymnast Mary Lou Retton scores perfect tens in the floor exercise and vault during the all-around competition to become the first woman outside of Eastern Europe to win all-around gold. (It helped that the Soviets and many Eastern Bloc nations had boycotted the Los Angeles games.) Retton became a superstar and household name in the U.S., even starring in several Wheaties commercials.

1984, Los Angeles: Carl Lewis wins four track-and-field gold medals in the same four events Jesse Owens had won in 1936.

1988, Seoul: Track star and fashion designer Florence Griffith-Joyner—”Flo-Jo”—wins gold in the 100 and 200 meters, setting world records in both. After the 1988 games, Flo-Jo designed the uniforms that the Indiana Pacers wore from 1990 to 1997.

1988, Seoul: Jackie Joyner-Kersee, Flo-Jo’s sister-in-law, wins gold in the heptathlon, setting a world record that still stands.

1992, Barcelona: The United States basketball team, known to history as the Dream Team, dominates its competition, winning every game by 32 or more points.

1996, Atlanta: Gymnast Kerri Strug vaults on a bad ankle and clinches a gold medal for the United States in the team competition.

2000, Sydney: Australia’s Cathy Freeman wins gold in the 400 in Sydney, becoming the first Aboriginal athlete to win an individual gold medal.

 

Cathy Freeman wins gold in Sydney. (Photo by Getty Images Sport)

 

2000, Sydney: Eric “the Eel” Moussambani, of tiny Equatorial Guinea, swims alone in his heat and receives thunderous applause (despite posting one of the slowest times in the history of the 100 Freestyle). Prior to the race, Moussambani had never swam in an Olympic-sized pool.

2000, Sydney: American Rulon Gardner upsets Aleksandr Karelin to win Greco-Roman wrestling gold in the 130 kg weight class. Prior to the gold medal match against Gardner, Karelin hadn’t lost in international competition in more than 13 years.

2008, Beijing: Jamaican sprinter Usain Bolt wins gold in the 100 and 200, setting world records in both events.

And now for the top ten:

#10 – 1924, Paris: Eric Liddell won’t race on Sunday, wins gold on Thursday.

If you’re asking yourself, “Who is Eric Liddell?” maybe this will help:

 

Liddell was a Scottish runner. He and British teammate Harold Abrahams were the subjects of the Oscar-winning 1981 film Chariots of Fire.

Chariots, which won Best Picture and three other Academy Awards, is about the 1924 Paris Olympics, where both Liddell and Abrahams won gold. (If you haven’t seen Chariots of Fire, it’s streaming right now on Netflix.)

Liddell’s best event was the 100 meters. He ran the 100 at the University of Edinburgh and held the British record in the event. He would have been a favorite to win the 100 in Paris, were it not for one problem: Liddell would have had to run a heat on Sunday.

Liddell was a devout Christian who refused to compete on the sabbath. So he withdrew from the 100 and entered the 400, an event in which he had little experience.

In Chariots of Fire Liddell learns that he is scheduled to run on Sunday while he is on his way to Paris. Another runner gives up his spot at the last minute so that Liddell can run the 400 instead.

In reality Liddell knew of the schedule several months before the games, and his decision not to compete in his best event was well publicized. Though he was a novice in the 400, Liddell qualified for the event on his own and didn’t need to take anyone else’s spot.

Still, Liddell’s 400 times leading up to the Olympics weren’t impressive, and no one expected him to win. Runners who specialize in the 100 don’t generally cross over to a race that requires a full trip around the track. Conventional wisdom at the time said that, by sticking to his convictions, Liddell had given up his chance of winning gold.

Liddell was a sprinter, and he treated the 400 as though it was a sprint. In the 400-meter final in Paris he got out to an early lead. The competition converged on Liddell during the second half of the race, but he was able to hold them off, winning the race—and the gold medal—in world record time.

Good thing the 400-meter final was held on a Thursday.

Abrahams, who was Jewish (and thus observed the sabbath from sundown Friday to sundown Saturday), ended up winning gold in the 100.

Here’s footage from Liddell’s gold-medal winning run:

* * * * *

#9 – 1996, Atlanta: Michael Johnson wins the 200 and 400 in gold shoes.

Eric Liddell, who specialized in shorter distances, earned a bronze medal in the 200 meters in 1924 to go along with his gold medal in the 400. It was quite an accomplishment to medal in both races.

For much of Olympic history, no male athlete had ever won both the 200 and 400. Men who compete in both events at such an elite level are rare.

Michael Johnson was rare.

Prior to the 1996 Summer Games in Atlanta, Johnson had won two gold medals each in the 200 and 400 at the 1991 (200), 1993 (400), and 1995 (200 and 400) IAAF World Championships. He entered the 1996 games as the world record-holder in the 200 and the favorite in the 400.

He also had a deal with Nike, who outfitted Johnson in a pair of golden racing spikes.

One of Michael Johnson's golden shoes. This one is on display at the Niketown in Honolulu. (Photo from Wikipedia.)

 

Nike, NBC, and millions of American sports fans had high expectations for Johnson, and Johnson more than lived up to them.

He won the 400 by nearly a full second, setting an Olympic record of 43.49 seconds. He followed that race with a win in the 200 in which he broke his own world record by 0.34 seconds. His record of 19.32 seconds stood until the 2008 Beijing Olympics, where Usain Bolt ran the 200 in 19.30.

In 1999 Johnson would set a world record in the 400, 43.18 seconds, that still stands today.

Here’s Johnson’s gold medal-winning, world record-setting win the 200:

* * * * *
It’s tough to top what Michael Johnson did in 1996, but there are still eight individual performances better than his.

Click to continue reading and learn about:

  • A woman who beat polio to become a superstar.
  • A man who overcame bashing his head on a diving board to win gold.
  • A 14-year-old prodigy whose feats can never be duplicated.
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About Josh Tinley

Josh Tinley writes the Away From The Action column at Midwest Sports Fans, covering all aspects of sport aside from what actually happens on the field, court, or track. Josh grew up in Indianapolis and graduated from the University of Evansville and Vanderbilt Divinity School. He is the author of Kneeling in the End Zone: Spiritual Lessons From the World of Sports and the managing editor of LinC, a weekly curriculum for teens that explores the intersection of faith and culture. Josh lives outside Nashville with his wife, Ashlee, and children, Meyer (7), Resha Kate (5), and Malachi (3). He will not allow himself to die before the Evansville Purple Aces make another trip to the NCAA Tournament. Follow him on Twitter @joshtinley or send him an e-mail.

Comments

  1. mortygwhiz says:

    Jim Thorpe winning gold for the decathalon and the heptathalon in 1912 Olympics.

    • Josh Tinley says:

      I thought about Thorpe, whose performance at the 1912 games certainly ranks among the all-time greats. But he was disqualified and stripped of his medals—unfairly, in my opinion—for violating the Olympics’ amateurism rules. I’m planning on including the incident in a list of Olympics low points.

      •  You only thought about Thorpe and didn’t list him as #1 ?   Just about every record ever made , yes even that of Spitz … has been broken ….  but …
        There has never been a performance even close to that of  Thorpe’s … and there never will be

      • Jim Thorpe’s 1912 Olympic trophies and records were reinstated in 1983 so it should be listed here and on the low points since he did not live to see the records reinstated.  Bright Path still holds some college football records today!!

      • Baloney….Thorpe is and should be listed number “1”……Sptz and Phlphs kind of cancell each other out as do renten and Shrugs…..As do Owens and Johnson and Carl Lewis…Thorpe stands alone with maybe only Mathis coming close. Plus you left off Al Orta,

      • The IOC restored Thorpe’s medals in 1983, so while he was screwed out of the glory he deserved in his lifetime, at least current Olympic records list him as gold medalist.   So tell us again why he only received passing consideration for your list.

  2. Conniecleary62 says:

    How could you leave Apolo Anton Ohno off the list

    • Josh Tinley says:

      This list only includes Summer Olympics performances. Thus no Miracle on Ice, Eric Heiden, or Bonnie Blair.

  3. Oodhamrich says:

    Billy Mills winning gold in the 1964 Tokyo Olympic 10k!

  4. GB Khalsa says:

    Another that should be included is the Japanese gymnast in 1976 (I believe) that won 6 gold medals and at least one on a broken leg.

  5. GB Khalsa says:

    I guess he just won 1 gold but it was impressive.

  6. Ken Carrigan says:

    I can’t believe that Olympic Gold medalist Dan Gable is not at least mentioned on this list for his achievement in totally dominating all of his Olympic opponents. He won the Gold without any single opponent even scoring a point against him (this has never been done before or since). 1972 Olympic Games in Munchen, Germany!

    • Gablefan says:

      This is such an obvious mistake that it taints the whole article.  By the time Spitz was in the pool, Gable was back in the United States training. 

  7. Ceagiphe says:

    What about Paavo Nurmi winning the 1500m and 5000m races which were only 26min apart? (Paris 1924)

    • Glad you listed this one.  Nurmi may be the greatest Olympic track athlete of all time – most certainly the greatest that most casual sports fans have never heard of.   He’d be close to Phelps in total medals had it not been for some meddling (no pun intended) by his own Olympic committee, and some draconian rules that disqualified him for 1932.

  8. Thewood1950 says:

    the great lim thorpe!!!

  9. Al Oerter won four consecutive gold medals in four olympics in the discus

  10. Don Schollander won 4 Gold Medals in Swimming to tie Jessie Owens as the most individual medals by anyone at the time. No mention???

  11. I vote for Jim Thorpe’s performances in the 1912 Games…winning the pentathalon and the decathalon.

  12. Flasherjr says:

    Ridiculous list. No way is Phelps #1. You don’t have Zatopek top 10. He is easily top 3, perhaps only second to Comaneci. Bolt should be higher than Phelps. Phelps was great, but he also had lots of luck and a huge performance by a relay teammate. 

  13. you didn’t even list the 3 greatest olympic performances…..3. paavo nurmi in 1924, simply unbelievable….. 2. bill russell leading the usa to gold by an average of 56 points per game victory margin versus in reality pro athletes from the entire world but the usa in those days restricted the team to amateur only and bill russell was told he could not enter the high jump if he wanted to play on the basketball team   1. the greatest athlete ever and ever and ever mr jim thorpe winning both the decathelon and penthalon in the same olympics 

  14. What about Al Oerter in the discus throw, 4 consecutive Gold medals in a row, and not once was he favored to win!

  15. Hoffmag1 says:

    To leave out Jim Thorpe and Al Oerter from you list is unbelievable.  What were you thinking!

  16. timetrialman59 says:

    Abebe Bakila running BAREFOOT in Rome? 

  17. Robster1961 says:

    How about Dave Wottle coming from far back in last place to nip the Russian to win gold in the 800 at the 1972 games?  All the while wearing a golf cap…

  18. 1912 Olympics.  Jim Thorpe won Gold in the Decathlon & the Pentathlon.  A total of 15 events.  No other Olympic Athletes has won those two events in the same Olympic Games before or since.

  19. Don Schollander, swimmer, 4 races, 4 gold medals, most by anyone at the time (1964, I think).  Unheard of achievement for a swimmer…

  20. Al Oeter, how is he not mentioned, not even Honorable Mention. 

  21. Elmersimendinger says:

    they were not thinking…probably some dumb ass chick polishing her nails while writing this crap

  22. Peterrboucher20 says:

    Teofilo Stephenson (Cuba) 1972, 1976, 1980 Gold Medalist / Heavyweight Boxing Division and at that time would have chuckled to himself against Muhammad Ali, Joe Frazier and George Foreman or even having those 3 in the same time together, Stevenson would have pummeled them and made them looking like punching bags

  23. Emil Zapotek of Czechoslovakia won the 5000 meter, 10,000 meter and marathon in the 1952 Olympics – certainly one of the greatest long distance accomplishments that only one person has tried to match (Lassie Viren of Finland fell short in the 1976 Olympics by coming in 4th in the marathon after winning the 5000 and 10,000 meter events)

  24. mr. Inside says:

    Eric Hyden, 1980. 5 gold Medals, 4 world records and he doesn’t make this list. Not much of a list.

  25. A Russian coach said of Beamon’s jump, “compared to this, we are all children.” 

  26. Um…   Mr. Inside, the list was specifically for summer Olympics.  ”
    Eric Hyden, 1980. 5 gold Medals, 4 world records…”    In what Summer did Eric Hyden speedskate?     Not much of a reading comprehension medalist, are you?

  27. without Usain Bolt in the top 10, it wasn’t worth reading.  

  28. The problem that I have with these lists is that the creators tend to reward tonnage.  
    75% of the medals awarded in swimming are about padding medal totals, nothing more, nothing less.    When you think about it, why are there 4 different gold medals awarded at each sprint distance when only one stroke, freestyle, produces significantly faster results?     Yes, the achievements of Spitz and Phelps are most amazing, but swimming is the only sport that allows its athlete to enter so many events.  I’m pretty sure that if track and field had a 100-meter bunny hop or backward walk or run on all fours, some elite athletes could have padded their medal totals, too.  Separate medals for Fosbury floppers, straddlers, and scissor jumpers in high jump? 

    I don’t need negative feedback from swimmers.  I’ve spent my share of time in a pool.  I realize how difficult it is to butterfly for a hundred meters.   I also know that it’s not the fastest way to get to the other end of the pool.  

    • Swimmer says:

      You obviously know nothing about swimming or its difficulty. Your ignorance makes you sound like an idiot. Its not padding, each stroke takes a lot of skill to learn and perfect, on top of that, its incredibly difficult to be the fastest at multiple events, especially because people at that level train for maybe one stroke or one event. Your comment about the bunny hop or backward walk isn’t even comparable. You have no idea what you are talking about. Spending time swimming for fun in a water park doesn’t mean you know anything about the actual sport.

  29. Bob Beaman didn’t just break a world record, he smashed by more than 0.5 meter. His mark stood as a world record from 1988 to 1991. In comparison, all but 2 of Michael Phelps world records have been broken in the 4 years since they were set.

  30. Taylormt02 says:

    Even though Jim Thorpe might not be the most outstanding performance, he should of been very high on this list.  It is very sad that he was not even mentioned.

  31. Track Fan says:

    Alberto Juantorena’s 400/800 double in the 1976 Olympics has never been duplicated.

  32. capsfan93 says:

    what about jim thorpe in the 1912 olympics and emil zatopek in the 1952 olympics, zatopek won the 5k 10k and marathon all in olympic record time. the marathon in the 52 olympics was the first time he ran the event

  33. Daniel Zheng says:

    Lezak’s relay performance in Beijing is in a category of its own. So many of the others below are just medal padding. Lezak was the oldest male on the team, racing against the world record holder, coming back from half a body length. To top that, the French team that he beat had been trash-talking for weaks, and it was thanks to him that Phelps was even able to get his eight medals.

    For some context: that would be like Usain Bolt trash-talking some 30 or 40 year old sprinter, and then that sprinter coming back to beat the Jamaican star from a meter behind, with only 25 meters left in the race.

    Or, to use the example most given below, Jim Thorpe competing against people who already had the world record, and being down by too many points before the last event, but still coming back to not only win both the decathlon and pentathlon, but set the world record in both.

    No comparison, Lezak not only did more for his team in the most adverse conditions than anyone else, he outperformed what logic says is absolutely impossible in any circumstance. I rest my case.

    • Kinda like when Ian Thorpe chased down USA in the 4×100 free in Sydney. Gary Hall Jr had predicted the US team would smash Australia like guitars, leading to the celebrations by the Aussies at poolside.

  34. PhillyJimi says:

    This list is a joke.  

  35.  Dan Gable in the 1972 Olympics didnt give up a single point in winning the gold medal in freestyle wrestling. Legend of a man

  36. “And since this is an American site with a largely American readership,
    the list is heavy on American athletes and Olympic sports that get big
    ratings in the States (track and field, swimming, and gymnastics).”
    you can say that again !!!
    just two examples from track and field:

    Lasse Viren wiinning both 5k and 10 k TWICE. in 72 and 76 – in the 1972 10k in spite of being tripped by another competitor and falling to the ground midway through the race.

    or even better Emile Zatopek winning 5K , 10k and the marathon in 1952 !!

  37. Alpine147 says:

    This is akin to rating the best wine, with many great choices and just as many opinions. Having said that I’m partial to Emil Zapotek, Jim Thorpe, Al Oerter, Dan Gable, Bob Beamon, and Paavo Nurmi in no particular order. All true champions.

  38. HurdlesAreLife says:

    I’m amazed that Billy Mills performance wasn’t an honorable mention (I don’t think it’s deserving of a top spot but it should at the least be an honorable mention)  He came in to the 10k as an absolute nobody from the US in an event never won by an American.  He was also racing the World Record holder at the time and his best time before the race was a full minute slower than Clarke (the WR holder).  Not only did Billy Mills beat Clarke in one of the most exciting finishes in track and field history he also set an Olympic Record and ran about 50 seconds faster than he had ever done before.  Possibly one of the greatest underdog upsets in olympic history deserves at least an honorable mention.

  39. Here’s another one. Alberto Juantorena. The only man ever to have won the 400 and 800 Meters in the same olympics.

  40. Peterboucher20 says:

    Ray Ewry (1873-1937) ; 10 Individual Gold Medals. All in discontinued Track & Field events. 1900, Paris Games ; 3 Gold Medals (Standing High, Long and Triple Jump) ; 1904, St. Louis Games ; 3 Gold Medals (Standing High, Long and Triple Jump) ; 1906, Athens “Intercalated” Games ; 2 Gold Medals (Standing High and Long Jump) ; 1908, London Games ; 2 Gold Medals (Standing High and Long Jumps. He and Wilma Rudolph both had one thing in common……they were both born with Polio !!

  41. Emil Zateopec, 5 K, 10 K, Marathon gold in one Olympics, never running the marathon until then.

  42. Dennis K says:

    First off, this is a decent list and *any* list would generate strong disagreement, but there are some important omissions.  Jim Thorpe, Nurmi, Viren and Zatopek should be at least on the honorable mention list.  And certainly Karelin or Gable should be ahead of Rulon Gardner if you are going to put a wrestler on the list.  I would also move Spitz and Phelps down a bit on the top 10 list due to the similarity in swimming events that makes it easier (not easy mind you) to win multiple medals than in other Olympic sports.  So, while I did see Phelp’s performance as the outstanding performance of the 2008 Olympics ahead of Bolt, the fact that 7 or more gold medals have been won in swimming more than once and no one, for example, has won more than 4 golds in T&F tells you what you need to know.  I would also make the argument that T&F has a higher world-wide participation and fewer barriers to entry/training so for me the victories carry a little more weight.

    In Track and Field  we may someday see someone win 5 golds but it will have to be a sprinter and he/she had better be able to add either the long jump and 400m to the shorter sprints, and they may need both unless they come from a very strong relay country.  So, in my mind, 5 golds in T&F would eclipse what Phelps has done, as amazing as it is. 

  43. Steve Redgrave. Five gold at five Olympics and a bronze.

    Bill Roycroft winning equestrian gold at Rome in 1960 with a broken shoulder sustained the day before.

  44. Starbucks2773 says:

    What about Jim Thorpe?

  45. Khud02 says:

    Rulon Gardner beat a guy to win the gold who hadn’t lost in 13 years and hadn’t given up a point in 6 years.  It is the athletic equal to the ’80 Miracle On Ice.  

  46. Judoknighterrant says:

    That no mention is made of Dan Gable puts all of this in perspective.  He shut out the best in the world – all of them.  That, I trust, says everything else one might.

  47. Olivertwist22 says:

    1976 American boxing team dominating the heavily favored Cubans.

  48. FlemGem says:

    The fact that Emil Zatopek, Paavo Nurmi, and Abebe Bakila don’t even receive honorable mentions is disgusting but not surprising…if all you know about the Olympics is what you see on American TV (as seems the case with this writer) you’d hardly be aware that there are track distances longer than 400 meters…or that there are nations outside North America.  I suppose one of the criteria for the list was “no names I can’t pronounce”.  Sad.

  49. Garykroeger says:

    Dan Gable not losing a single POINT in 1972 doesn’t make this list??????????

  50. American Bob Beamon destroys the world record in the long jump. His record of 29 feet, 2.5 inches (8.90 meters) stood for 23 years.

  51. truesportshero says:

    Eric Heiden won every event in world record time. 

  52. Grasshopper2571 says:

    Billy Mills. An indian runner from Kansas. Won the 10,000 meters in the 1964Tokyo Olympics. He was tripped and fell down and got up and still won the race. He was a USMC Lieutenant at the time

  53. Billy Mills, 1964 Tokyo Olympics, gold medal, 10000 meter race.  He was such an underdog that the US team didn’t even issue him his own shoes. He had to borrow a pair of used shoes from a teammate.  He led for most of the race, then, during the final lap, was bumped into the 3rd or 4th lane by two other runners as they tried to pass him.  He went into his “kick” and won the race and the gold medal.

  54. Paul Goodner says:

    To not put on this list the incredible feats of such athletes as Thorpe, Oerter and Zatopek is  unbelievable. You’re dealing with recent history.

  55. Silverfox1991 says:

    you Know what t would be more cool a list of the top ten olimpic sports casters of all time.

  56. Steve Redgrave won five gold medals in consecutive Olympics in rowing. The last one while battling Colitis and having been diagnosed as diabetic

  57. Silverfox1991 says:

    What about the “Merical on ice” US hocky team. well I guss that would be on a list of top ten winter olimpic moments or top ten Olimpic moments of all time….  

  58. Fairbanksbob says:

    Eric Heiden dominating the speed skating events in the 1980 Winter Olympics should have been there as well, He won the 500, 1000, 1500, 5000, and 10,000. That would be like someone winning (by time) 200, 400, 800, “mile” and 5000 track and feild events. That would never happen and never will.

  59. Evan Hodge says:

    Viren? (Finland). Too many Americans. You have no sense of fairness or population comparisons. You have had your “ass” whipped by individuals from countries with a fraction of your investment  in sport. At least you admitted the despicable treatment of Owens.

  60. Eadams44720 says:

    Dave Wottle 1972 Munich. Comes back from 30 meters back to win Gold in the 800 meters

  61. dan jannsen the speed skater

  62. Heure35 says:

    Rulon Gardner.  What an incredible upset!!!!

  63. Ever hear of a guy named JIm Thorp?

  64. Jblakeney says:

    Bob Hayes 1964 Toyko.  Gets the the stick in the 4×100 relay in 5th place and wins by 3 meters.

  65. bobbackwards says:

    Most impressed by Bob Mathias’ two wins in decathalon.  But I also think you have to put Abebe Bakila’s two wins in the marathon in there somewhere. 

  66. Viren -72. Falling over badly in 10km run just to come back and win it with WR time? Paavo Nurmi participating in 12 competitions to win 9 of them and to get 3 second places in distances between 1500m and 20km. Then he was banned from -32 Olympics because he was “professional” .:D

  67. Britain’s Derek Redmond’s touching performance in the 400M semi-finals in the 1992 Olympics. He hurt his hamstring but kept going (with help from his dad) to finish the race, knowing he wouldn’t make it to the finals. Not every noteworthy Olympic performance has to be a win.

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